Why we should not ascribe to behaviorialism!

I am increasingly disturbed with the amount of behavioralism practices that run rampant through our educational and training environments. In my world of accelerated adult education, the buzz theory is constructivism. Why do I call it a buzz theory? Certainly not because it’s an invalid theory; quite the opposite! I strongly believe in it, as well as the underpinnings of humanism and social constructivism for effective education. I call it a buzz theory because it’s popular to tout, but not … [Read More]


Coaching in Adult Education

In my mental preparation for Agile Coaches Camp in Minnesota, I am excited to talk to coaching practitioners after a couple months of research and study of current coaching practices. My research is about exploring the adult learner’s ability to enact personal change using coaching techniques within formal education that inspires a growth mindset. For the scope of coaching I am inferring, I discard terms of mentorship, training, and consultancy and rely on the definition of Jatkauskiene, Jatkauskas, and Jovarauskaite … [Read More]


Being a practitioner manager, not an administrator

Despite being in a highly operational role, there has been tremendous value discovered in maintaining a practitioner’s viewpoint as a faculty member as well. I frequently facilitate courses just like any other online adjunct faculty member, and this recently offered me another opportunity to improve administrative processes.


Kanban Moves Upward in Academic Administration

This is the story of the Princess and the Pea. Sort of. Actually, this is the story of how administration felt the effects of kanban being used in areas that were not immediately visible. Only in this case, the effect the pea (kanban) had on the princess was so positive that she demanded more peas!


Introducing Flow and Timeboxing in College Curriculum

Being the writer, designer and a primary facilitator for the orientation courses for our university’s associate and bachelor courses has given me a wonderful opportunity to continually and iteratively improve the quality of the course for both student learning and faculty effectiveness. I note faculty effectiveness as crucial for any course design because student learning cannot be maximized if the faculty are overwhelmed with busy grading. If there is nothing else to justify curriculum designers, it is this balance of … [Read More]


Practicing Agile in Curriculum Design

Scott Marsee, my lead instructional designer, and I were fortunate in our networking at the ASTD 2012 conference this past January with our introduction to Dr. Steven Villachica, a tenured associate professor at Boise State University’s School of Engineering. He is currently teaching an advanced instructional design course for master level students, and when he heard of our successful agile curriculum design techniques, asked if we would present a webinar to his students. This was a wonderful opportunity to get … [Read More]


Systemic Resolution in Curriculum Design

There is a certain amount of pride that I have with our current curriculum development process in that it is very systemic to reduce conflicting information and formatting across courses as well as addressing academic rigor necessary for a top quality degree programme. However, there are several levels of system resolutions available for curriculum design, including the facilitator level. We have started developing communities of practice to represent each expertise area so that while faculty cannot physically change the curriculum … [Read More]


Learning Models within Paradigms

During Agile 2011 I had the pleasure of leading an Open Jam session that focused on learning models and how they fit within learning theories or worldviews. We took at look at the progress made with learning theories in general starting with behaviorism and noted that each one presented excellent viewpoints and needs that we have as humans. We recognised the value of not being despotic about a particular paradigm, but to recognise and pull the values needed, especially when … [Read More]


Achieving Group Consensus for Online Learning

A professional colleague of mine, Scott Marsee, and I recently presented at No Educator Left Behind hosted by Indiana Wesleyan University’s adult education division. We focused on how to facilitate online groups effectively by discovering how adult learners are motivated in group environments and subsequently employing strategies that maximizes learning.


Ensuring Students Hold Faculty Accountable

As educators for adult learners we are passionate about providing awareness and motivation to students. We research, study, design and implement methods to improve the learning experience. The cornerstone of strategies involves adult and social learning theories, and we seek to ensure those theories stay current. Our curriculum is stellar, full of experiential learning, reflection, and tools for successful critical thinking. We pour hours of investment into faculty training. However, in our excitement for the world of andragogy, we easily … [Read More]


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About Marian

My passion is centered around ensuring effective learning experiences that improve people's lives. Developing a learning mindset is my ultimate goal whether working with academic programs or corporate training; formal or informal learning practices. It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning.

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