The Value of Guidelines over Rules

It may be my natural rebellion against rules. It may be my frustration when I say something in the declarative as a consultant and it’s received as a rule. It may be my annoyance watching people make up rules because they simply aren’t able to explain the why. Whatever the motivation, I’m becoming more aware of the need to embrace guidelines instead of set rules when coaching or training individuals or teams working with models. For example, instructional design focuses … [Read More]


Values and Feedback Loops for the Training Process

The title of this post was going to be Evaluating our Training, but the core message is more than simply evaluation … it’s about setting up reliable feedback loops from all the stakeholders to create positive improvement. Please note that I refer to positive improvement in terms of effectiveness, not a tick mark on a report for training completion. How many times have you provided training, conducted your little satisfaction / request for improvement survey, and then moved on to … [Read More]


Making Facts Relevant

Stories make for very effective learning, sure, but how do you practice using them?


Forgetting the value of limiting WIP! Again.

Back in June I was gloating over my success of balancing life by truly adhering to the value of limiting my WIP. Whups! Six months have come and gone. Yeah, that wasn’t because I was sipping tea on the porch. In fact, by the time November hit, I was busy having a physical breakdown trying to keep too many balls in the air. As long as everything tended to “take turns” in priority, everything worked. However, when my director role … [Read More]


Transparency in Bloom’s Taxonomy for Training

For most instructional designers, this phrase simply means that you make sure the student can read the expected outcome just before an activity or are made aware of it as they go into an activity. However, Liz Keogh nicely blended the affective learning levels of receiving, responding, and valuing into her training due to her complete integration of the cognitive learning levels with the training.



Giving Space for Creative Design

The blog series that I have created for developing curriculum with an agile mindset is coming to a close, with only two posts remaining. This one focuses on the slack that the process has now given us.


Technology in all its glory and pitfalls

Next on the list for my blog series for developing effective curriculum is to take a look at technology, in all of it’s glory and pitfalls! Recall that we discussed that developing solid outcomes are the cornerstone that drives the quality of your course so that you can then determine resources, and then select activities, optimize your facilitation options, and diversify the experience based on the needs of your learners. Throughout all of those posts, you’ll note a distinct lack of technology. … [Read More]


Right-brain? Left-Brain? Diversifying the Learning Experience

Next on the list for my blog series for developing effective curriculum is a look at not only selecting and optimising appropriate activities to ensure outcomes or objectives fulfillment, but that you also deepen your activity diversity for maximal learning impact.


Creating Holistic Learning Experiences

Facilitating a course or workshop that engages the participant and is easy for you to create is the ultimate achievement. However, to do that, there is a need to instill responsibility and motivation within your participants, which requires some knowledge of adult learning theory and whole person learning approaches.


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About Marian

My passion is centered around ensuring effective learning experiences that improve people's lives. Developing a learning mindset is my ultimate goal whether working with academic programs or corporate training; formal or informal learning practices. It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning.

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